Boo 2: More Scary Movies You Can Watch with Your Teens

In honor of Halloween, here is my second list of horror movies you can watch with your teenagers – a countdown of creepy culminating in a classic everyone (I think) should watch.

Note: Unlike my first list, this one contains mostly R-rated films. I have indicated the reason for each rating and would note for, what it’s worth, that these are all films I would show our own children (who are 14 and 16) if I can just get them to humor me.

5. Pitch Black (2000) R for language and sci-fi violence and gore– This one reminds me, initially at least, of The Flight of the Phoenix, a 1965 Jimmy Stewart film about a group of travelers struggling to survive in the middle of the Sahara Desert after their plane was forced down by a sandstorm. Interesting film. The personalities of the survivors clash as they face almost certain death and then come together when hope presents itself. Good movie (unlike its 2004 remake).  Pitch Black begins very similarly – a spaceship passes through the debris of a comet trail causing it to crash-land on a nearby planet. The passengers find themselves marooned in a desert on what looks like a lifeless planet. As in Phoenix, the disparate characters interact and clash, but then this movie goes in another direction entirely. Happily so, because that’s what makes it a horror movie. Vin Diesel plays Riddick, an ultra-tough antihero, the one the others turn to when they discover they’re not alone on the planet after all.

4. The Host (2006) R for creature violence and language; subtitled – An awesomely-ugly mutant monster is spawned by pollution in the Han River. When the monster emerges from the river one day, killing many and snatching a young girl, her comically dysfunctional family pull together to try to rescue the girl. It was a blockbuster in South Korean and got great reviews when it opened in the US. It’s scary, funny, and has very cool monster-chasing-fleeing-people sequences.

3. Blair Witch Project (1999) R for language – Have you ever been camping in the woods? Not at some friendly campground with bear-proof dumpsters and bathrooms with running water and other campers within shouting distance – but in the woods, alone, well out of shouting range, before cell phones, where nobody would notice right away if you disappeared or be able to find you easily if they came looking. I have and it’s truly scary. The night is very big and dark and potentially full of bears and maniacs and all manner of evil creepies. Once, while camping with a friend, I was scared almost senseless by something creeping up on us through the brush behind our tent in the dead of night. When my friend and I finally worked up the nerve to investigate, we nailed a pair of very startled opossums with the beam of the flashlight.

 In this movie, there’s something much creepier than opossums out there in the dark. When it was first released, it was marketed as “found footage” – film discovered with video equipment in the woods of Maryland a year after three college students disappeared there while filming a documentary about a local legend, the Blair Witch. This one got mixed reviews but I thought it was very convincing and authentically scary.

2. Alien (1979) R  for sci fi violence/gore and language – I’m still a little upset with my mom that she didn’t take me to see this when I was thirteen. Consequently, I read about this movie longingly in Starlog magazine long before I actually got to see it. And when I finally did get to experience the scariest movie ever set in space, I was not disappointed. Made at a time when so many science fiction movies were either idealized, happy futures (ala Star Trek) or fairy tale space operas (ala Star Wars), the Nostromo and her crew was a gritty and convincing vision of the future. Wonderfully suspenseful with one of the toughest female leads to date, this is the movie to convince you that yes, monsters are real and they live in space where no one can hear you scream.

1The Birds (1963) – At about 3:00 in the morning on August 18, 1961, a massive flock of sooty shearwaters began to crash into homes and buildings along the northern edge of Monterey Bay in California. Residents of Pleasure Point and Capitola woke up that morning to find the ground littered with the dead and dying sea birds. At the time, it was postulated that the birds became lost in the fog and were drawn by the city lights. Thirty years later, it happened again, except this time the birds involved were brown pelicans and scientists were able to isolate a cause. The pelicans had eaten poisoned fish. The culprit was domoic acid, a neurotoxin produced by a diatom that was found in the stomachs of fish in the area. Scientists found evidence that the same neurotoxin was also the culprit the summer of 1961 when those sooty shearwaters were found flying into buildings, dying on the streets and regurgitating anchovies.

The story of those poor poisoned shearwaters inspired movie history by capturing the attention of one particular summer resident – Alfred Hitchcock. A month later, he had secured the rights to a novella by Daphne Du Maurier and 2 years later he released The Birds. In his awesomely chilling story, the birds are not dying – they’re attacking the residents of Bodega Bay, a quaint California coastal town. Hitchcock managed to make the sunny, cheerful town appear properly eerie and did what no other director had done before in portraying large groups of animals acting intelligently together with purpose, creating his first, and only horror/fantasy film. And one that became an icon in horror film history. A great pick, I think, to watch with your teenager who was weened on (and saturated in) 21st century video magic if only to show them what amazing (and horrifying) films could be made long before CGI.

If you’d like to read more about the making of The Birds, see some cool stills from the movie or read the original article in the Santa Cruz Sentinel about the tragic bird event of 1961, see:

http://www.hitchcockwiki.com/files/articles/TheMakingOfTheBirds/

http://www.filminamerica.com/Movies/TheBirds/

http://www.santacruzpl.org/history/articles/183/

If you’d like to see my first list of teenager-family-friendly horror movies check out Boo! Scary Movies You Can Watch with Your Teenager

Far Out: Best First Lines of Sci Fi and Horror Novels (that I Think You Should Read)

The modern American reading public has the collective attention span of a stressed-out, sleep-deprived gnat with ADD. At least, that’s what conventional wisdom would have us believe. English teachers, editors and published writers all seem to tell aspiring writers every day that they’ve got to hook readers with the first line or they’ll lose them. Disgusted editors, they are told, will fling their manuscripts disdainfully into the slush pile if they’re not captivated by the opening lines. As a member of the reading public, I find these assumptions vaguely insulting.

And a little true – though I tend to give an author a few paragraphs or pages before I make any summary judgments about his or her skill. So I don’t require that a “hook” be buried in that first line to keep me engaged. But I have to admit, I love a good opener.

So here are a few of my favorite first lines from my two favorite genres, science fiction and horror. Not only are these intriguing sentences, but each begins a book that I would highly recommend reading. See what you think:

 “It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.”
1984, George Orwell
  
 
 
 
“Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the Western Spiral arm of the Galaxy lies a small unregarded yellow sun.”
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams
 
 
 
 
“Behind every man now alive stand thirty ghosts, for that is the ratio by which the dead outnumber the living.”
2001 – A Space Odyssey, Arthur C. Clarke.
 
 
“It was a pleasure to burn.”
Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury
 
 
 
 
 
 
“In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit. Not a nasty, dirty, wet hole, filled with the ends of worms and an oozy smell, nor yet a dry, bare, sandy hole with nothing in it to sit down on or eat: it was a hobbit-hole, and that means comfort.””
The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkien
(Okay I know this is two sentences but it could have been one and it’s one of my favorite openers.)
 
 
 
 
 “No live organism can continue for long to exist under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream.”
The Haunting of Hill House, Shirley Jackson
 
 
 
 
 
 “The story so far: In the beginning, the universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.”
The Restaurant at the End of the UniverseDouglas Adams
(Two sentences again, I know. But it’s my list and I can cheat if I want to.) 
 
 
 “First of all, it was October, a rare month for boys.”
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
 
 
  
 
 
“My name is Odd Thomas, though in this age when fame is the altar at which most people worship, I’m not sure you should care who I am or that I exist.”
Odd Thomas, Dean Koontz
 
“Sam Vimes sighed when he heard the scream, but he finished shaving before he did anything about it.”
Night WatchTerry Pratchett
 
“Lyra and her daemon moved through the darkening Hall, taking care to keep to one side, out of sight of the kitchen.”
The Golden CompassPhilip Pullman
 
 
 
 
  
 
“The terror, which would not end for another twenty-eight years – if it ever did end – began, so far as I know or can tell, with a boat made from a sheet of newspaper floating down a gutter swollen with rain.”
ITStephen King
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
“The year that Buttercup was born, the most beautiful woman in the world was a French scullery maid named Annette.”
The Princess Bride, William Goldman
 
  
 
 
“No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man’s and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water.”
War of the Worlds, HG Wells
 
 
 
 “The regular early morning yell of horror was the sound of Arthur Dent waking up and suddenly remembering where he was.”
Life, the Universe and EverythingDouglas Adams
(Nobody opened a story like Douglas Adams.)